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Idaho National Laboratory

Hydropower
Indian Summer 1998 Star Article

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Picture of People involved in the program

Katie Blanding, left, of the Office of Naval Research, visited the Yankee Fork area to witness a research project she is sponsoring with the INL Institute and Shoshone-Bannock High School. Ben Rinehart, LMITCO, holds a device used to signal fish migration. Ed Galindo, Fort Hall Teacher, is at right. Looking on is Bob Pence, DOE-Idaho American Indian Program manager and tribal liaison.

An Office of Naval Research official made a special trip to the Yankee Fork fisheries project with students and mentors.

Katie Blanding traveled to the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River Aug. 3 to witness the research project she is sponsoring with the INL Institute and the Shoshone-Bannock High School.

Others who accompanied her were Robert Pence, DOE-Idaho Tribal liaison representative; Ben Rinehart, LMITCO mentor and technical advisor to the students; Ed Galindo, a Shoshone-Bannock High School science teacher who manages the experiment with Ann Rydalch and Julene Messick from the INL Institute.

Six years ago, Galindo and his students were determined to find out what happened to the salmon and steelhead their ancestors hunted in Idaho’s streams some 40 years ago.

A Science Action Team was formulated with the help of Messick, INL K-12 program manager. The experiment was expanded with a $150,000, five-year grant from the Office of Naval Research in Washington, D.C.

The project enables participants to learn natural production and mortality factors associated with fish in early life stages. With a goal of increasing live egg-to-fry hatch rate, more than one million eggs have been used in streamside incubation boxes in 40 locations, and more than 90 percent hatched.

Dams, land use and pollution reduce chances for salmon and steelhead to reach their birthplaces to spawn. With this program, progress is being made to improve the climate for fish recovery.

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Steelhead hatched eggs

INL mentor and technical advisor Ben Rinehart explains and views the thousands of steelhead hatched from the eggs in refrigerator boxes. Students started about three years ago by incubating steelhead eggs, and this year will incubate more than one million eggs of both steelhead and chinook salmon.

For more information about the Indian Summer research project, including pictures of the hatch boxes and test results, view the Indian Summer III report. (2.0 MB PDF)

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Students at fish hatchery

INL mentor and technical advisor Ben Rinehart explains and views the thousands of steelhead hatched from the eggs in refrigerator boxes. Students started about three years ago by incubating steelhead eggs, and this year will incubate more than one million eggs of both steelhead and chinook salmon.

LMITCO Star, 8/18/98

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